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. and in particular, all of the women of and from afghanistan who have joined us today. i am very honored to be the honorary co-chair of the u.s. afghan women's council along with laura bush. mrs. bush has been the real inspiration and driving force behind the council from the very beginning. and the council represents a commitment, a public-private partnership to try to support the women of afghanistan in the transition we are undergoing. we can point to a lot of progress some of it mentioned by president pedroya. but we're well aware this is a serious turning point for all of the people of afghanistan. but in particular, for the hard fought gains that women and girls have been able to enjoy. and what we can do as americans to support the courageous women and men to build the afghanistan they imagined. she and i talked about what she might do next, the word "rest" never entered her vocabulary. we talked more about once again, i'm following her wherever she goes and am proud to be the honorary founding chair. the institute is co-sponsoring today's events. it's following up on the national
sacrificed for the promise of a safe and secure afghanistan. but i actually come back to the time when i met a remarkable woman who is changing afghanistan. roya is chief executive of a software development firm called citadel. and the local authorities did absolutely everything they could to stop her dead in her tracks. they even pressured her family to close her company, but she like a lot of the women sitting here and like so many women across afghanistan absolutely refused to be in-tim gated. the first time she competed for an afghan government proper correc project, she went up against six businesses led by men and she won. and it's a good thing because she's invested almostshe went u businesses led by men and she won. and it's a good thing because she's invested almost all of her profits to provide internet access to 35,000 girls. and she's just getting started. today she has plans to help five times as many girls across afghanistan. now i'm sure you'll hear this in the discussion in a little while. it is hard enough to start your own business anywhere else in the world. but to start i
afghanistan, pakistan and india. while iran is often considered a middle eastern country, in fact, it's historically its cultural ties are as strong if not stronger with its eastern neighbors, with afghanistan and south asia. and, of course, iran will be a pivotal player as it has been all along in afghanistan, especially next year as the united states and nato began to withdraw all its, some if not all of their forces. we are launching a new issue brief this year that have some recommendations for u.s. policy. including a bigger role helping afghanistan manage its water resources, which is a key issue for iran as a downstream neighbor. and the united states can contribute to resolving other regional problems such as energy shortages, ethnic conflict, and drug trafficking. this would have enormous benefit not just for iran but for afghanistan, pakistan, india. indeed, the united states indirectly because of the drug trafficking. the principle author of this report is my good friend, fatemeh aman, is an expert on iran and south asia. she's worked as a journalist, media and political an
on the eastern neighbors, specifically afghanistan, pakistan, and india. iran is considered a middle eastern country but is historically as strong if not stronger with its eastern neighbors. afghanistan and south asia. iran will be a pivotal player as it has been all along in afghanistan, especially next year as the u.s. and nato began to withdraw some if not all of their forces. they have recommendations for u.s. policy. a bigger role helping afghanistan manage water resources which is a key issue for iran as a downstream neighbor. they can contribute to other regional problems. it would have enormous benefit not just for iran, but afghanistan, pakistan, india. part of this report is an expert on iran and south asia. she has worked as a journalist, media and political analyst and has written in english and persian. she is a frequent contributor. i have known her for five years now and have been impressed by the depth of her knowledge and passion. she is a senior geographer for the corps of engineers. she studied the watershed and its terminus which is the basin. she served in afghanistan fr
government and addressing the afghan national development strategy and the afghanistan compact in 2,005 2,006. and what i found is that there is a very high level of mistrust at the highest levels of the afghan government in the water issues and in particular, there was a proposal to put in the contact something about afghanistan signing agreements with its neighbors which is actually required under the international law to get the project and levels of suspicion was so high that i was removed from the document. so i just want to emphasize the fact security, confidence building are likely to be necessary before we can move on to implement these ideas where there are good technical solutions that may be waiting that where the suspicions are extremely high and the stakes are very hi. >> if i can add one thing in afghanistan i'm sure you saw this. the different ministries play their cards close and hold them close to their chest the ministry of water and culture irrigation livestock, moral rehabilitation and development all have different interests and water and there needs to be different c
i'm serious when i tell you that i think of roya and the women like her that i met in afghanistan. every time i hear the amazing numbers that illustrate how far this country has come since 2001 and that underscore what secretary clinton was saying a few minutes ago about how critical our choices are with respect to the future. in 2001 by then, there were only 900,000 afghan children in school. and all of them were boys. today, nearly 8 million students were in school and more than a third of them are girls. think about what that means for the future. in 2001, maternal mortality was 1600 per 100,000 births. today, it's down by 80%. in 2001, life expectancy for the average afghan was 42 years. today, it's 62 years. and rising. in 2001, 9% of afghans had access to basic health care. today, 60% of afghans live within an hour of basic health services. in 2001, there was only one television station and it was owned by the government. today there are 75 stations. and only two -- and all of those but two are privately owned. and in 2001, there were virtually no cell phones in the country.
, but the transition to the next phase in the u.s.-afghanistan relationship involves a difficult diplomatic dance. the united states negotiated a deal called "the bilateral security accord" which would keep most troops in the country when nato's 75,000 leave next year. the deal hit a signnag. afghan president karzai presented a new last-minute set of demands. on this edition of "inside story" we will discuss america's future in afghanistan. first, this background: >> afghan president hamid karzai again refused to sign the bilateral security agreement on monday. instead, adding more items to a growing list of demands. it was during a last-minute meeting with u.s. national security advisor susan rice that karzi insisted the u.s. would need to start peace talks with the taliban and release 17 after gangs from guantanamo bay before the bilateral security agreement got his signature. but rice said negotiations are over. >> if the agreement isn't signed promptly, what i said to the president is we would have no choice. we would be compelled by necessity, not by our preference, to have to begin to plan
, peaceful, stable afghanistan is realized. and both of you, i know, have a great deal to say on this subject. >> well, even as our troops drawdown, start to drawdown, there's still many, many groups on the ground in afghanistan. it gives us a chance now, all americans, really, the chance to support those groups, to find the groups. the doctor is here, opus prize winner to promote her schools and women all over afghanistan. leslie schweitzer, fundraiser for university of afghanistan. i think maybe we may get some questions out of afghanistan from american university. you can give directly to the american university of afghanistan to make sure girls have scholarships there. so i think as our troops leave, it's very, very important that we continue to support all the programs that were built over the last 10 years in afghanistan, including many that came from this very council, the u.s. afghan women's council, and to work with our own congressmen and women to make sure afghanistan stays in the forefront, that people do pay attention to it. it's going to be -- once our troops leave, the eyes of
hosted an event examining the security of south asia, specifically afghanistan and iran. panelists discussed the regional interests of the u.s., russia, and pakistan. nice cold clear day in washington and is probably the same in geneva. i hope if there is news from there, you will let us know. there is a connection between what is going on in geneva and what is happening here. if there is a nuclear agreement or improvement in relations between the u.s. and iran, it is going to have an impact on iran's role in the region. we are focused on the eastern neighbors, specifically afghanistan, pakistan, and india. iran is considered a middle eastern country but is historically as strong if not stronger with its eastern neighbors. and south asia. iran will be a pivotal player as it has been all along in afghanistan, especially next year as the u.s. and nato began to withdraw some if not all of their forces. they have recommendations for u.s. policy. helping role afghanistan manage water resources which is a key issue for iran as a downstream neighbor. to othercontribute .egional problems i
role to help afghanistan's manage water resources which is acontri key issue for our brand as aal downstream neighbor is the united states has other regional problems withous benefi energy shortages a and drug trafficking this has to turntana this benefit for iran, pakistan, india and into the united statesinc indirectly because of the o drug goo frien the principal author of thise's report is an expert in southystd asia and has worked as anshe's t currtly presids written widely in english to a person isn't a frequent-based pitcher to james publications is with the virginia-based companye kn yearializing to analyze foreign media.essed by the i have known her five years.for have always been impressedeaker by the depth of her knowledge and passion. next we have a new speakerngnee here who is the senior research geographer the u.s.e b army corps of engineers whenre she began a study that you will hear more about end with that basic an end she served in afghanistan as a senior adviser on watershed sut management to the commanding ant general of regional commando southwe
pretty striking. there have been changes in the economy. in afghanistan. we drove across kabul to the university in afghanistan. i wish every american could go american university in afghanistan. there, if every american could go there, or if american could see what is happening just in that one across kabul to it, i believe it would change most americans about what we have accomplished theh our allies and with afghan security forces in afghanistan. the city now is full of cars, isere is traffic jams, there shops opening all over the place. people are in markets. drive -- we couldn't across kabul, they wouldn't let across kabul years before. it just simply was too dangerous. it is still a dangerous place, by the way. i don't want to sound pollyannish here. things havent is changed for the better in afghanistan and the american people, sadly, don't know it. relative to the american by way ofy itself part of the story, of course, is the growth in the number of students. when it opened i think it with 53 students. there is now 1,000 students there. 300 of them are women. and they
.s. security agreement with afghanistan could be on hold. what it could mean for american forces. and the story behind this, the final resting place of jfk. >>> there could be a game changer considering that security agreement between the u.s. and afghanistan. it involves the issue of trust. afghan president, karzai, indicating that he does not trust the u.s. the well is so tainted, that president obama sent a letter to karzai promising to respect his nation's laws and sovereignty withdrawing with caution. and mike, the leadership that the president needs right now, is to be broadsided by karzai. >> one more thing from karzai to this president in particular. you're right, the president has written a letter to him, saying that yes, we have come to an agreement on the bilateral security agreement. and the united states is on questioned to ending the combat mission of american forces in afghanistan. the longest war in american history. the president writes that karzai will be cooperating and training and advising and assisting forces, and it would be a residual force. after 2014, that's the last y
's no question that lasting prosperity in afghanistan will take root only when women have as loud a voice as men, not only on election day, but every day. it's essential, it's the prerequisite to the future stability of afghanistan. but make no mistake, it's not enough. it's not sufficient, and won't do the job alone. that's why the united states firmly supports and will continue to support an afghan-led peace and reconciliation effort as the surest way to end the violence and bring lasting stability to afghanistan in the region. peace is possible possible if it respects the historic achievements that afghanistan has made over the past decade. all of those things i listed and talked about. including and above all the protection of the rights of all afghans, both men and women. as part of the outcome of any process, the taliban and other armed opposition groups have to end the violence, break ties with al qaeda, accept afghanistan's constitution, including the provisions on women's rights. those are the standards which will lead us in this effort. there can be no compromise on these points. there
check check >> the u.s. and afghanistan reach a tentative deal to keep u.s. troops past next year as av gab elders gather to talk about the agreement. no deal as world powers try to come to terms on a solution on iran's nuclear program. >> henry trey raydull takes a leave of absence to seek treatment after pleading guilty to the buying of cocaine. >> hello, welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy. a decision on the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan now in the hands of a council of tribal leaders. more than a decade after america entered the region thousands of delegates are gathering on thursday, known as the loya jirga. they'll accept or reject a security pact. u.s. forces that remain after next year will receive immunity from afghan courts - that was a key point. also - american forces will not target afghanistan civilians, including in their home. afghanistan will fund the forces. secretary of state john kerry clarified a key part of the deal. >> it is entirely train, equip and desist. there's no combat role for the american forces. the bilateral agreement is an effo
." >> this is bbc world news america. the u.s. agrees with afghanistan on language that would allow american troops to day past -- stay pass 2014. now they wait to see if the country's tribal elders will also sign on. >> we agreed on language that would be submitted, but they have to pass it. >> the next round of negotiations over iran's nuclear -- starts in geneva. trail, with the number of women at the top. >> for all our viewers in -- on public television in america and around the well. the united states and afghanistan agreed to the final talk -- security deal that would allow american troops to stay in the country after 2014. willkerry has revealed it now go before the grand council of afghan elders, the loya jirg a. not discussrry did details. >> we have agreed on language that would be submitted to the loya jirga, but they have to pass it. i think it is inappropriate for me to comment at all on any of the details. it is up to the people of afghanistan. >> john kerry there. for more on the agenda of that important meeting of afghan elders, this report from kabul. >> the delegates gathering fo
from john scary on the kerry on the future of women in afghanistan. it's 40 minutes.on the kerry on the future of women in afghanistan. it's 40 minutes. >>> i want to once again thank the university for your active leadership not only on behalf of the intellectual study of and analysis of issues of importance to our world, but your leadership in the civic life, not only of washington, but of our country and indeed across the globe. this is yet another goexample o that and i welcome the members of the diplomatic corps and in particular all of the women of and from afghanistan who have joined us today. i'm monitored to be the honorary co-chair along with laura bush. mrs. bush has been the real inspiration and driving force behind the council from the very beginning. and the council represents a commitment, a public-private partnership to try to support the women of afghanistan in the transition that they are undergoing. we can point to a lot of progress. some of it mentioned in the sle excellent video that was just shown. but we're well aware this is a serious turning point for all
was in a special office in afghanistan in 2011. this is about one hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, good evening. i am the ambassador. my role tonight is just to host and nothing else. i am happy to have for another time in nine, ten months the women policy group at the croatian embassy. i'm very happy to have you here as frequently as possible, because these events are really very nice. i will say no more except we are happy also the embassies keep open in washington. [laughter] and while my pleasure and honor to have ms. linda robinson whom i met at georgetown? we shared one evening -- and i must say that probably i was the most attentive of all the listeners at your part of the presentation which has to do with what you are going to talk about tonight. so, that much for a knee. i am sorry that we have bring you from the food so quickly, but time is running. [applause] >> thank you so much, ambassador, for having us back again for opening your beautiful embassy. we had a wonderful time last year and we know that this will be another wonderful evening here -- >> [inaudible] >> we are truly grateful t
levin inlks about the situation afghanistan. followed by remarks from obama and prime minister of iraq nouri themaliki and remarks at antidefamanion league. week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman about improvements in the country as the u.s. and prepare to remove troops from afghanistan in 2014. from the council on foreign relations. is an hour. >> welcome to the foreign relations. i'm johnathan karl. a high honor to be here with levin. introduction.s no interduck carl levin is the chairman of the senate armed services from the great state of michigan and of special interest to me, just back from a trip to afghanistan where he commanders over there and also had a one on one president karzai. i'm eager to hear about that and senator levin has some tomarks about the trip afghanistan and then we will have a conversation. levin?r >> well, thank you, jon. we appreciate the invitation to join you this morning and look forward to that conversation as well. just here to share my ideas but hopefully to rec
in afghanistan. it shouldn't make any difference. when they lose their life as part of the effort to protect innocent life in the war on terrorism. if they're killed by a terrorist committing violence on behalf of foreign jihadists, then they are casualties of the broader war on terrorism, and they deserve to be treated as such. earlier this year i introduced legislation that would make the fort hood victims eligible for all of the honors and benefits available to their fellow u.s. service members serving overseas in combat zones. my cosponsors in the house are representatives carter and williams, and they have numerous cosponsors in the house, and today i'm offering a modified version of that legislation as an amendment to the defense authorization bill. by enacting this amendment, congress would honor the memories of those whot their lives at fort hood, and it would help their surviving family members, all of whom, as u can imagine, have experienced tremendous pain and hardship as a result of this terrorist act on our own soil four years ago at fort hood, colline, texas, at the hand of maj
soldiers killed, the war in afghanistan was supposed to be wrapping up. but if the war in afghanistan is truly winding down, why are we now reportedly committing to leave thousands of troops there for at least another decade? and also a tragic attack on one of virginia's most prominent politicians once again casts a harsh light on the mental health system. and did you ever ask youst if you could beat your child in a footrace? a new study says yes, you would leave them in the dust. >>> we start with the war in afghanistan. afghans say they have reached an agreement with the u.s. on a framework that includes a long-term substantial military presence. that had lead to concerns that we may have troops in afghanistan for many years to come. joining me now to discuss that involvement in afghanistan are christine fair, assistant professor at the center for peace and security studies at georgetown university. she served as a political officer to the united nations assistance mission to afghanistan in kabul. also joining us from washington, d.c. is pj clark former assistant secretary of state.
to watch it all started out on the up coming up on us and afghanistan looks like after western troops to pull out as elders in kabul votes he played fifteen thousand years the troops down another decade. because i just went to the case of problems we are one year. french forces there pulls out the taliban are in bold with government forces seemed the least schools have closed. his return to taiwan but inevitable for twelve years on. are we witnessing and analysts warned you'll see an exclusive report. and if asked. to date. we'll also be checking in with how avoiding harm and he'll watch segment he's been in the newsroom and say hello once again thank you toss well. these are the headlines. t people arrested in london on to the discovery of three women can they save the health care system decades. all the sites indicates his involvement that said france's interior minister on to the rest of us that hiking back up in connection with recent shootings impacts. among the pike been ringing in arsenal to the ica is that the fighting members of the comedy great announcing the state shape for
relationships has been as critical to the united states is those with pakistan and afghanistan. president karzai has added new conditions to a security agreement with could jeopardize the whole thing. and in pakistan, activists have blocked the main supply route for forces in protest. >> they are taking the law into their own hands. this man was transporting milk cartons. he was eventually allowed to pass. those found to be carrying supplies to coalition forces have been forced back in protest of u.s. drone attacks. >> nato supplies and troops in afghanistan, there is a reason that not a single truck has been allowed through your today. it has yet tried to break it up. >> police are standing by and watching the vigilantes in action. >> if they come to this point, we will stop the protesters. >> the government is saying it is not supporting you. >> they are not supporting us. >> the opposition has been -- mainly his supporters have been blocking the nato supply route. and baselessly killing civilians. the timing started after the death of the militant leader. accusing them of appeasement and wors
with afghanistan and other countries in south asia. that's here on c-span2 at 9:30 a.m. eastern. later on c-span president obama will be in new orleans for a speech on jobs and the economy. and a little after 1 p.m. eastern. at 3 p.m. the stimson center hosts a panel of senior u.s. officials and other experts on efforts to keep weapons of mass destruction away from terrorists. >> i think regardless of where you are on the political spectrum, we all feel very fortunate and grateful that we live in the united states of america. it's a very unique place. and if america was considered to be a product -- and we do try to sell our product overseas -- what's our brand? and i think our brand is the constitution, the rule of law and our values system. and under that brand and under that value system there is that notion of equal under the eyes of the law. under that brand and value system is the ada and trying to elevate the rights of americans with disabilities. >> this is a treaty, a treaty is a law. the emotional and political arguments that are in favor of the treaty no one can disagree with the
. we'll need them in this kind of world religion. mentioned, i recently returned from afghanistan where meeting withw days our commanders, our troops, president karzai. and the defense minister from brussels before he went to afghanistan. he feels that things have significantly improved and changed for the better during the last 10 years. i have been there perhaps 12 times or so. the staff later will tell me if it is really a 11 or 13. we've been there a lot. strikinges are pretty especially in the last few years. that is not the impression the american people have. that, to me, is the obvious fact that things have changed and changed for the better in afghanistan. first of all, it's more secure. we and our allies have made a the growth, the strength of the afghan army and the police now which has grown in a much more capable and respected force including the acal police, which has made major difference particularly in the villages about anna stan -- villages of afghanistan. the most feared force are those 25,000 local police feared by the taliban. because they are so directly ed to the
tour in iraq and afghanistan this generation the 9/11 generation has met every mission we have asked of them. because of their heroic service the core of al-qaeda is on the path of defeat, our nation is more secure, and our homeland is safer. there are men and women like the soldier and soon to be veteran i met a few months ago, jakari hogan. jakari deployed to iraq twice, and survived not one but two--excuse me, three separate i.e.d. explosions when she was well enough she deployed again, this time to afghanistan, where she was often the only woman in our foreign operating bases. she proudly wears the combat action badge. today she is committed to helping other wounded warriors recover from the trials of war. helping the troops, she says, is what i'm all about. my fellow americans that's what we should be all about. our work is more urgent than ever because this chapter of war is coming to an end. soon one of the first marines to arrive in afghanistan 12 years ago brigadier general daniel yu will lead his camp pendleton marines to deploy. and in the coming months more of our troops
. she was embedded with special ops in afghanistan in 2011. this is about an hour. >> so, ladies and gentlemen, good evening. so i'm the croatian a ambassador. i'm just -- my role tonight is just a host and nothing else. i'm happy to have for another time in nine, ten months women in foreign policy group at the croatian embassy. i'm very happy to have you here as frequently as possible, because these events are really very nice. and, well, i will, i will say no more except that we are happy, also, that a the embassies -- b that the embassies keep open in washington. [laughter] and, well, my pleasure and honor to have ms. linda robinson here, so -- whom i met at georgetown. we had, we shared one evening, and i must say that probably i was the most attentive of all listeners at your part of the presentation which has to do with what you are going to talk about tonight. so that much from me. i'm sorry we have drag you from the food so quickly, but time is running. so, patricia. [applause] >> well, thank you so much, ambassador, for having us back again, for opening your beautiful 'e
no one will. the rt and afghanistan tribal leaders gather for my mom hey if you shun u s troops be granted immunity in the country neon twenty fourteen the future of us intervention in afghanistan coming on and on the mainland and attentive to the scale in favor of your arteries the fda is about to take away your regions of the facts will get saturated in the details of the rendition of a. yet the stain on the twenty first find him in washington d c and m lopez and you were watching rte one political and tribal elders are meeting in kabul afghanistan this week to discuss the future of us troops in the country. he is known as lay eggs are about one inch to one thousand tribal elders will vote on whether or not to get the u s troops in unity in afghanistan beyond twenty fourteen. such an agreement the us has threatened to pull all troops out of country and led afghan troops take on the taliban on their own dhoni karzai and us secretary of state john kerry have already reached a draft agreement to buy immunity for us troops were at least another decade. our travel elders have a dab
. the education system and afghanistan. so many of them, the number given to them is counterintuitive. so i do not use it. in terms of the lower grades, before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out, to the extent they have been, 900,000 boys. now a million students in school . 3 million of those are girls. none of those who could've been educated before we got there with our allies. were 20,000e teachers, all male. is now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. health care much improved. child mortality significantly down. afghan refugees who fled pakistan have returned home. how is it that 67% of the american people recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? because the picture is much, much better than that number. i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe that the press has missed a good story. it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. the impression that our people get doesn't come from either. it comes from what they
, but only of presidential nominations. >> turning to afghanistan where thousands of tribal leaders gathered to discuss a security pact with the u.s. if approved it could keep 15,000 american troops in afghanistan through 2024. hamid karzai says he does not trust the united states and will not sign a deal until after the presidential elections. >> the president obama demonstration breathed a sigh of relief that the loya jirga in kaboom were getting a look at the security agreement. any reassurance that it was under review was from comments by hamid karzai. the concern is will the agreement be signed in time for the u.s. to move combat forces out of afghanistan and deplay a stability team in its place. the military is concerned it will not have enough time to carry out the transition. it involves tens of thousands of troops, equipment and support personnel. they want to make certain they have plenty of time to work out the logistics and the relationship necessary with the afghan military, so that it is a seamless transition. there's this consideration. if hamid karzai gets his way, and the de
/11 in afghanistan. and you took the president's radio address and told the world that the role of the afghan women would be important for building the future of their country and so you've heard a lot this morning. we're at a crossroads. the women have made enormous progress. they are very worried that the progress may be reversed. they are importing events i had. the elections in april for president, as well as a negotiated settlement, reconciliation process. we still don't know where that will go. but to say that the women are concerned is an understatement. they fear that they may be a bargaining chip in that negotiated process with the taliban. so what do we say, particularly in the backdrop of a united states that his war weary, where we are focused on our many challenges at home? what can we do to ensure that this progress is not reversed, and as secretary kerry said, that this strategic necessity that the women represent to a better, prosperous, peaceful, stable afghanistan is realized? and both of you i know have a great deal to say on this subject. >> well, even as our troops drawdown, st
- trying to convince farmers in afghanistan that they don't need to grow openium, and the headlines in a hotel. -- in a moment. >>> a reminder of the top story - the situation in the philippines, where dead bodies line the streets four days after the typhoon hit there. the official number of dead climbs. the total more than 1500, but there are estimates that are higher than that. the u.s. marines are flying into the philippines, part of an international aid effort. >> many philippinos have been without food and water. the united nations released $25 million of funds and is calling for more. to bolster efforts countries pledged support. aid agencies channelling food and resources. the biggest challenge is how to get the hope to those that need it. the united states - they sent the aircraft carrier "george washington", hmas "daring" is on route. and royal transport aircraft had been sent. aid agencies unicef are on the ground. chris de bono said aid needs to be distributed as soon as possible. >> at the moment we are looking at a total of 4 million children affected. the ones that are
and answer time. i started to write september 2009. rights after i was ambushed in afghanistan is this is one of the classic scenario is. most live in mountain valleys of the little villages nobody really lives high on the mountains they live on the valley floor and usually there is only one road. by 4:00 in the afternoon everyone knows exactly where. kid you hear me okay? and then you'll be driving down the road in the middle of the valley. i was ambushed 4:00 in the afternoon i remember thinking every deadbeat -- this is that bad ambush i have been involuntarily of gillespie is actually used to teach it as an instructor i thought if they are my students i would fail them. was badly put together. are they having a bad day? that i realized after that one day of thinking about it it was not a taliban ambush but a particular village in the valley that was passed about how much aid we had given to other villages they were sending us a message how they felt about our aid prior to rescission that seems like a crazy over reaction we will know that happens all the time that with the assistance we gi
) scottrade-proud to be ranked "best overall client experience." >>> the fate of our troops in afghanistan could be decided if a meet nothing kabul tomorrow. secretary of state john kerry is hammering out the details and it is not without controversy. jennifer griffin has more from there. >> 2500 tribal elders will meet for to decide the fate of any u.s. troops will be allowed to stay in afghanistan post 2014. the meeting is so important to the process of getting a bilateral security and standards of force agreement secretary of state kerry called afghan president karzi last night. the u.s. failed to reach a similar agreement in iraq. and a lack of agreement in afghanistan would impact the u.s. ability to carry out drone strikes in afghanistan and pakistan. president karzi's office said that president obama planned to pen a letter to apologize acknowledging that the u.s. erred and killed civilians. that was an effort to apiece their elders. >> what i can tell you, we don't comment on presidential correspondence. and i don't have specifics on the language. i would reiterate that we take all
on establishing a facility outside sanaa to hold prisoners from guantÁnamo and afghanistan. the talks could be one step toward closing guantanamo, which president obama has repeatedly vowed to do. more than half of prisoners currently at guantÁnamo are from yemen. many have been held for over a decade without charge or trial. yemeni officials have reportedly drafted tentative lands for the facility, but a final deal could take months. former guantÁnamo bay prisoner david hicks has filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn his you thousand seven conviction. captured in afghanistan, he was held at guantanamo for five years before reaching a plea deal to return to his native australia. he admitted to material support for terrorism and agreed to renounce his claim of suffering abuse in u.s. custody. he was the first guantÁnamo prisoner convicted under the military commissions act. this week, hicks filed an appeal saying he pled guilty under duress. --a statement, hicks said againstl judge ruled the new york city police department's controversial stop and frisk program is seeking reinstatement after being
thousands of american troops in afghanistan for another decade. but karzai said he will leave the signing of the agreement to his successor next year. the u.s. special representative on afghanistan will join us later in the program. an apparent u.s. drone strike in pakistan has killed another senior figure of the haqqani network. police said he was one of three top militants who died when missiles blasted an islamic seminary. there's been a series of recent attacks on haqqani leaders. the afghan group is allied with the taliban. the geneva talks on curbing iran's nuclear program made little headway today. the u.s. and five other powers are trying to reach a draft agreement with iran to ease some economic sanctions if tehran freezes its nuclear efforts. but iran's deputy foreign minister said this morning there'd been a loss of confidence since the last round, earlier this month. >> i'm not in a position to go into the detailings of that but they have some differences and those differences are on issues still there. >> reporter: including sanctions? >> on s >> ifill: later, the iranian off
. >>> afghanistan's loya jirga or tribal council continue to deliberate it's future. >> reporter: today was the final day for delegates at the jirga to study and debate this bilateral security agreement. tomorrow they're expected to give their opinion on it publicly to the president of afghanistan. now, senior source from the government involved in the jirga has told al jazeera is that we're likely to see the edition of one line or one clause to this security agreement stipulating that american soldiers must not enter of a damage homes, arrest afghans or hold afghans in detention centers of their own in afghanistan. now entering afghan homes has ban very political topic over the la few days being debated. and it was addressed by barack obama in a letter to karzai, which was handed out to jirga members. they are now saying they may want to have that inside the security agreement. but beyond the jirga hall itself, the political crisis has ton about this security agreement as delegates are leaving after their day of debate today the head of the jirga was extremely anger in response to news
toe a stable afghanistan as they are withdrawing. on a number of topics we don't agree on everything. we have common interests and now we are talking we can produce a stable out come in that very, very troubled region. >> if this proves to be successful this could be a key building block to something else. >> yes. >> jim walsh thank you for yourr insight we pribat british great. british -- appreciate it. the government well comed th wee news. rebels have seized one of syria's large over the oil field. control of the field means control of syria's usable reserves. >> karzai says he will not sign a security deal allowing the u.s. troops to stay in the country after 2014. this comes after days of debate in afghanistan. the tribal elders announced they are backing the deal. jane ferguson has more. scandal and argument continue to surround afghanistan's decision makers. >> a gathering of representatives in the capital is expected to decide on sunday if it will approve a security agreement with the u.s. of president hamid ca karzai is sticking to his position. he won't sign the agreement u
for change. tribal leaders urge afghanist afghanistan's president to allow thousands of troops to stay in the country. taking action against new york's stop and frisk policy by teaching people rights. secretary of state john kerry defending a deal made with iran over the nuclear program. israel and several u.s. lawmakers are complaining they will move forward. a victory for floamacy. today, bad diplomacy opened up a new path toward a word that is more security. a future in which we can verify iran's nuclear program is peaceful and that it cannot build a nuclear weapon. >> write house correspondent mi mike viqueira has more on reaction from washington. >> in genervgeneva, the preside emphasizing this is a first step toward a simple goal ensuring iran cannot develop a nuclear weapon. they are concerned that iran with its current program is on the path toward doing just that, a so-called breakout going from a civilian oriented nuclear program that can produce domestic energy to a program that can produce a nuclear weapon. no one wants to see that happen and that is what the president has
.s. and afghanistan. they have approved the deal but he says he is not ready to sign it. the u.s. is now trying to get him to sign that deal as soon as possible. mike is in washington and mike how is the white house reacting to the fact that he has changed the coast. >> . >> the u.s. and the afghan government has more at stake. not having the u.s. forces as residual forces after they leave at tend of 2014 as president obama has promised. susanne rice says the president national security advisor here, traveled to afghanistan, she sat with other top u.s. commanders they did not agree. karzai has said even though that council of elders that you reported the jirga, approved the deal on the table, karzai says it has to wait, until the new elections for president are held in the spring, and also making fresh demands he wants afghan 17 of them that are being held, he wants them releases and a more concrete promise, that u.s. forces will not engage in raids nighttime raids of afghan households. and it's been a sore point within afghanistan for some time. gave an interview to afghan t.v. where he said exactly
whom olies that don't bore. >> the security deal between the u.s. and afghanistan hanging in the balance as that country's president does an advance face. how the children to educate them could be at risk. oj simpson told he is staying behind bars while a judge shot down where is for a retrial on his robbery conviction. >> texas officials are fighting texting while driving. >> texas officials are fighti >> the obama administration is looking at new ways to finalise the security deal with afghanistan. white house officials confirm they are pushing the afghanistan foreign minister to sign it. hamid karzai says he won't approve it until new demands are met. the deal will keep thousands of u.s. troops there past the end of next year, susan rice was face to face with hamid karzai in afghanistan urging him not to delay the deal. >> if the agreement is not signed promptly, what i said to the president is we would have no choice, we'd be compelled by necessity, not our preference, to begin to plan for the prospect that we will not be able to keep our troops here. they will not be
the troops will lead the front lines in afghanistan to head home for the holidays. we are with them every step of the way for emotional reunions. some of them meeting their children for the first time. >> it's the nelson mandela you have never seen before. >> you are not a stranger. you are nelson mandela. >> a new movie with big time oscar buzz exploring the man behind the myth. so what does the nobel peace prize winner himself think of it? ♪ you've got to hold on to what we've got ♪ >> the prince and the pop star, why prince william probably shouldn't quit his day job. and the exuberant performance from taylor swift that has so many people talking tonight. >> announcer: keep it right here, america, "nightline" is back in just 60 seco >>> good evening. on this thanksgiving eve. you will meet people who have powerful roonz easons to be tha. we'll travel from the front line of afghanistan to emotional reunions to families back home. part of an initiative, launched by abc and walt disney to celebrate the people who serve this country. it's called "home for the holidays" and here is abc'
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